LPM Unars gelar Pelatihan PEKERTI 2016

[vc_row][vc_column][stm_title title=”LPM Unars gelar Pelatihan PEKERTI 2016″][/stm_title][vc_single_image image=”2616″][vc_column_text]Komitmen Universitas Abdurachman Saleh Situbondo untuk memberikan layanan pendidikan berkualitas kepada masyarakat terus diupayakan. Salah satu upaya tersebut adalah diselenggarakannya kegiatan Pelatihan Pengembangan Ketrampilan Dasar Teknik Instruksional atau jamak dikenal sebagai PEKERTI, yang diikuti oleh seluruh dosen pengajar di lingkungan Universitas Abdurachman Saleh Situbondo. Kegiatan yang  dimulai sejak 18 maret sampai 23 Maret 2016 bertempat di Aula UNARS  ini merupakan program pelatihan yang bertujuan untuk meningkatkan kompetensi pedagogi dosen dalam melaksanakan tugas mengajar  serta bimbingan akademik terhadap mahasiswa dengan tujuan menghasilkan lulusan perguruan tinggi yang berkualitas , cakap secara akademik dan mampu bersaing dalam dunia kerja.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”2614″][vc_column_text]Penyelenggaraan Program Peningkatan Keterampilan Dasar Teknik Instruksional (PEKERTI) merupakan pelatihan pengembangan profesionalisme dosen yang diselenggarakan DIKTI sejak tahun 1987 , adalah pelatihan yang diselenggrakan untuk pertama kalinya di Universitas Abdurachman Saleh Situbondo dan diinisiasi oleh Lembaga Penjaminan Mutu Universitas Abdurachman Saleh Situbondo (LPM UNARS). Secara umum materi pokok Pekerti meliputi Kompetensi Paedagogis (Merancang pembelajaran ,Mengelola pembelajaran Menilai pembelajaran , Memanfaatkan hasil-hasil penelitian untuk meningkatkan mutu pembelajaran) , Kompetensi Kepribadian , Kompetensi Profesional Kompetensi Sosial. Materi pokok tersebut disampaikan oleh narasumber yang telah ditunjuk oleh DIKTI sebagai instruktur pelatihan.  Dengan terselenggaranya Pelatihan Peningkatan Keterampilan Dasar Tekhnik Instruksional (PEKERTI) di lingkungan UNARS akan memberi cakrawala baru bagi dosen pengajar dalam melakukan tugas akademik di perkuliahan,  ataupun dalam melaksanankan tugas pengabdian kepada masyarakat melalui kegiatan penelitian. (ves)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Faculty of Humanities celebrates students

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Students take crash course in Japanese sword fighting

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Smart launches new Architecture and Design BSc Honours

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Faculty of Humanities celebrates students

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Students take crash course in Japanese sword fighting

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Actor Jeff Soberg will be Smart’s 2016 speaker

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Students take crash course in Japanese sword fighting

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Smart launches new Architecture and Design BSc Honours

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Actor Jeff Soberg will be Smart’s 2016 speaker

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172590468{margin-bottom: 27px !important;}”]A new study led by Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172543824{margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]As evidence has mounted that distance running is not just a natural human activity enjoyed by millions, but one that played a key role in evolution, a puzzle has emerged. Why, if humans are so well adapted to running long distances, do runners get hurt so often?[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172634050{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]A study out of Smart School and the National Running Center at Smart-affiliated Templeton Rehabilitation Hospital provides a puzzle piece, linking injury to the pounding runners’ bones take with each step. The work, led by Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Jane Eckhart, found that a group of runners who had never been hurt landed each footfall more softly than a group who had been injured badly enough to seek medical attention.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner css=”.vc_custom_1473173012608{margin-bottom: 14px !important;}”][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”8/12″][stm_mg_audio][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”2/12″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172693280{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Statistics on such injuries vary, but somewhere between 30 percent and 75 percent of runners are hurt annually, a number that has led researchers to investigate a wide array of possible explanations, from modern running shoes to stretching, running frequency, weight, biomechanical misalignment, and muscle imbalance.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”5/12″][stm_blockquote cite=”Francesca Stoppard The Darvin B. Xander Associate Curator of Prints”]One never injured multi-marathoner’s stride was so smooth, she ran like an insect over water. Weight was not a factor, with heavy runners among the light-footed and lighter runners among the stompers.[/stm_blockquote][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”7/12″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172969666{margin-top: -10px !important;margin-bottom: 30px !important;}”]With most runners being heel-strikers today, the added shock, multiplied over thousands of footsteps, could explain high injury rates. The 2012 study added fuel to the debate, finding a two-to-one difference in repetitive stress injuries between heel- and forefoot-strikers.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473172807857{margin-bottom: 40px !important;}”]Jane Eckhart’s research focused on heel-strikers exclusively, since they make up most of today’s runners, and examined a cohort seldom studied, partly because they’re pretty rare: those who have never been injured. Jane and colleagues recruited 249 female recreational athletes who each ran at least 20 miles a week. They investigated the participants’ strides by having them run over a force plate that recorded the impact of each step.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1473173112409{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}”]The runners agreed to respond to a monthly online questionnaire that detailed injuries over two years. With the results in, researchers first examined reports from the 144 who experienced a mild injury and the 105 who didn’t, finding little difference between the two large groups.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]